FEATURES

HUMAN TRAFFICKING: THE AIRLINE INDUSTRY RESPONSE

HUMAN TRAFFICKING: THE AIRLINE INDUSTRY RESPONSE

Connecting over four billion passengers on 20,000 city pairs annually, aviation is often referred to as the business of freedom. But the ease and speed of air travel can also be misused by criminals who want to deny freedom to others through the crime of human trafficking. With an estimated 24.9 million people globally being trafficked each year, Tim Colehan reveals the…
THE ISRAELI-PALESTINIAN: STILL AN AVIATION SECURITY CONCERN ON ISRAEL’S

THE ISRAELI-PALESTINIAN: STILL AN AVIATION SECURITY CONCERN ON ISRAEL’S

14 May 2018 will be a day of celebration for some, but one of grief for others. On this date 70 years ago, the declaration of the establishment of the State of Israel was proclaimed. So, whilst realising Zionist aspirations and offering a refuge for European, and indeed global, Jewry in the aftermath of World War II and the Holocaust, it also triggered a violent conflict,…
Emotional Support Animals: pigs, peacocks, pythons ...and even appaloosa ponies

Emotional Support Animals: pigs, peacocks, pythons …and even appaloosa ponies

Over the last two years, US air carriers have reported a significant increase in passengers bringing aboard emotional support animals (ESAs), resulting in a subsequent rise in incidents involving unruly animals during flights. Alexandra James examines the case for ESAs and asks whether more specific legislation and tighter airline policies are needed to tackle this…
DRONES: protecting airports and aircraft

DRONES: protecting airports and aircraft

The increasing popularity and widespread availability of drones is causing concern for those within the aviation industry, both from safety and security points of view. Collisions with aircraft are increasing in frequency, and terrorist organisations are already exploiting the access opportunities and anonymity that they offer. Clayton Simmons explores these issues and…
stowaways

Stowaways: Wheel Well Security

Since commercial airlines began transporting fare-paying passengers across international borders, there have been individuals willing to risk their lives to covertly exploit these flights, often to escape corruption, warfare and famine. Illustrating the problem, this February, two Ecuadorian teenagers fell to their deaths from the wheel well of a Latam Airlines flight…
Airport Apron Heists:

Airport Apron Heists:

Although apron heists in South America are low frequency events, their impact can be high and can expose serious deficiencies in local risk management for each airport. Luis Umbria briefly analyses the most recent apron heist in Brazil and considers the importance of a thorough and efficient Security Management System (SeMS) in order to address this threat. Three years…

CURRENT ISSUE

LEAD EDITORIAL

BY PHILIP BAUM

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Doing the: the myth of security prioritisation by Philip Baum

In terms of regulation, few other industries can compete with aviation. Whether designed to address safety or security concerns, there are multitude of entities - some global, some regional and others national - making demands of airports and airlines. It’s often challenging to know which acronym one should comply with: ICAO? TSA? ECAC? EASA? NASP? OTS? DfT? CAA? Industry associations then publish their own guidance notes and position papers, develop…

INDUSTRY NEWS

Air Watch

28 MARCH 2018: NORTH CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA

Boeing was attacked by a ‘WannaCry’ virus that threatened to spread to machines used in aircraft testing. After an initial panic, the company announced that it had taken control of the situation and that the attack had not caused any significant damage.

25 MARCH 2018: RIYADH, SAUDI ARABIA

Yemen’s Houthi militia fired ballistic missiles at Riyadh’s King Khalid International, as well as airports in Jizan, Najran and Abha. Seven missiles were intercepted in Riyadh by Saudi air defences. An Egyptian resident was killed, and two others injured after debris fell on a residence nearby.

19 MARCH 2018: TAGBINA, PHILIPPINES

Agricultural pilot, Lynbert G. Laguda, 65, died after his light aircraft was shot at by the New People’s Army as he was dusting crops. Laguda managed to land the plane safely but died on his way to hospital.

15 MARCH 2018: THISTED, DENMARK

A 19-year-old man died after crashing his car into the terminal building at Thisted. The impact caused the vehicle to burst into flames. It is thought the crash was a deliberate suicide attempt.

13 MARCH 2018: DURBAN, SOUTH AFRICA

A security guard at King Shaka International shot his female colleague dead. Her body was discovered in a landside staff-only area. The security guard responsible turned himself in to police.

27 MARCH 2018: MANCHESTER, ENGLAND

Stephen Brown, 42, was fined £1,500 for hurling racial abuse at airport staff. Brown was deemed too drunk to fly home to Belfast after consuming nine pints of beer at a football match in December.

26 MARCH 2018: MANCHESTER, ENGLAND

Rudiger Krause, 50, a German air traffic controller, was found guilty of seven charges of outraging public decency after admitting that he was addicted to taking up-skirt photos of women without their consent. Krause was caught taking pictures up a woman’s skirt at a convenience store at Manchester Airport while he was visiting family in the UK in October. He avoided prison but was ordered to pay £1,035 in costs.

23 MARCH 2018: DUBLIN, ÉIRE

Peter Kernan, 57, a former Aer Lingus worker at Dublin Airport, pleaded guilty to helping smuggle illegal immigrants into Ireland. He was jailed for four years.

20 MARCH 2018: CRAWLEY, ENGLAND

Beverley Chapman, 45, pleaded guilty to behaving in a threatening, abusive, insulting or disorderly manner on a British Airways flight from the Costa del Sol to Gatwick. Chapman spat her drink over a member of cabin crew and then attempted to trip her up after being denied more alcohol on 1 September. She was ordered to pay £791 plus £164 costs.

19 MARCH 2018: MANCHESTER, ENGLAND

It was reported that Tamas Farkas, 36, was found guilty of sexually assaulting a female passenger seated beside him for 20 minutes during a Jet2 flight from Budapest, Hungary.

28 MARCH 2018: CHENNAI, INDIA

SpiceJet cabin crew protested that they were being strip searched, molested and made to remove their sanitary towels after SpiceJet received reports of cash pilferage, and implemented cabin crew body searches. SpiceJet initially responded that the searches were standard pat-downs performed by security personnel of the same gender and in line with industry standards.

31 MARCH 2018: FARIDABAD, INDIA

Captain M K Kachru, the pilot of the Indian Airlines flight that was hijacked by Kashmiri terrorists to Pakistan in 1971, died aged 93.

27 MARCH 2018: NEW YORK, NEW YORK

Mohamadou Lamine Mbacke, 31, escaped from custody at JFK as he was being security screened prior to being deported back to Senegal. He was arrested three days later in Chicago.

24 MARCH 2018: ABUJA, NIGERIA

The main access road to Abuja Airport was blocked by demonstrators, mostly young people, protesting the demolition of Gosa Market.

22 MARCH 2018: SAUDI ARABIA & ISRAEL

Saudi Arabia opened its airspace to an Israeli-bound flight for the first time in 70 years. An Air India flight from New Delhi flew directly to Tel Aviv, a journey that took 7.5 hours. Whilst the Israeli government hailed the move as historic, El Al, the Israeli airline, commenced legal action against the government arguing that it should also be permitted to fly the same route rather than a more circuitous, and therefore more costly, one.

24 MARCH 2018: BANGKOK, THAILAND

A 29-year-old male passenger by the name of Naphat allegedly told boarding agents that he did not have any prohibited items in his luggage “except for a bomb” as he boarded a flight to Yangon.

18 MARCH 2018: CHENNAI, INDIA

Deepu Anand, 29, and Sakthi Saravanan were alleged to have called the police and made a bomb threat against Chennai Airport. The call was traced and the pair were arrested.

16 MARCH 2018: AHMEDABAD, INDIA

Pritesh Trivedi, 27, made an anonymous phone call to air traffic control claiming a bomb concealed in a soft drink can had been placed inside the terminal. Searches did not reveal anything suspicious and the call was declared a hoax. Police managed to trace the call and Trivedi was arrested on 29 March.

30 MARCH 2018: NEW DELHI, INDIA

A Nepal Airlines flight from Doha to Kathmandu diverted to Delhi after a passenger became abusive towards crew and passengers.

28 MARCH 2018: DAK LAK, VIETNAM

It was reported that a 17-year-old girl was caught smoking in the bathroom of a Vietjet flight from Hai Phong. She claimed it was her first time flying and didn’t know that smoking was prohibited. She was fined VND2 million (c. £62).

28 MARCH 2018: ANTALYA, TURKEY

It was reported that a man became drunk and abusive during a flight from Ekaterinburg, and shouted to other passengers that he would blow up the aircraft.

27 MARCH 2018: HONG KONG

An unidentified woman on an AirAsia flight from Kuala Lumpur to Hong Kong kept attempting to lie down in an empty row, despite being told repeatedly by crew to sit in her assigned seat. A male passenger then became involved, and video footage of the man shouting at the woman to do as she is told went viral.

29 MARCH 2018: SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH

A 16-year-old boy evaded capture by police by climbing over a fence into the airport and hiding inside the wheel well of an aircraft parked at a hangar. He was discovered by a mechanic and handed over to police.

15 MARCH 2018: CHIANG MAI, THAILAND

Chinese nationals Xiong Mingfei, 55, Xia Gaoyong, 27, and Xie Xinhui, 54, stole 4,000 baht (c. £90), an iphone, credit card, glasses and the passport of Danish tourist Ole Nielsen Andersen, 65, at Chiang Mai Airport. Police tracked the culprits using CCTV footage and arrested them at a hotel in the city.

8 MARCH 2018: SAO PAULO, BRAZIL

A 59-year-old American Airlines pilot was arrested after allegedly assaulting a member of ground crew. The incident occurred just prior to a flight to Miami, which was delayed by 27 hours as a result.

6 MARCH 2018: BANGKOK, THAILAND

Eight LSG Sky Chefs employees were found to be stealing duty free items from carts on British Airways planes in Bangkok and selling them online. Police recovered 181 items, including designer sunglasses and bags worth up to 1 million baht (c. £22,740).

8 MARCH 2018: JOINVILLE, BRAZIL

Daniel da Silva, 18, was pulled from the burning wreckage of a helicopter that crashed during what is believed to have been a hijacking attempt. Pilot Antonio Mário Franco Aguiar, 57, and co-pilot Bruno Siqueira, 20, were both killed. Da Silva was allegedly hijacking the helicopte

3 JULY 2017: HILLSBORO, OREGON

Holden Gorka, 25, attempted to commandeer a helicopter at gunpoint as a flight instructor and a student were preparing to take off. Gorka was fatally shot by a police officer after he abandoned his plan to seize the aircraft and attempted to run into a nearby field.

18 MARCH 2017: LAHORE, PAKISTAN

An Ethiopian Airlines flight, en route from Addis Ababa to Beijing, diverted to Lahore after a suicidal male passenger tried to enter the cockpit by force. The assailant was extremely violent, making it difficult for the crew and passengers to restrain him. However, a Chinese bodybuilder, Cao Guoxiong, managed to overpower the hijacker. Reports indicate that the captain exited the flight deck and assisted Cao in applying restraints.

23 DECEMBER 2016: LUQA, MALTA

Moussa Saha and Ahmed Ali, both in their 20s, hijacked an Afriqiyah Airways on a domestic flight between Sabha and Tripoli in Libya. The two Libyan men were armed with imitation guns and grenades, and allegedly intended to divert the plane to Rome to seek asylum and to start a new political party called ‘The New Fateh’ in honour of the late dictator, Muammar Qaddafi. Due to fuel limitations, the crew landed in Malta instead. None of the 116 people on board was injured, and the hijackers surrendered after a standoff on the runway.

29 MARCH 2016: LARNACA, CYPRUS

Seif Eldin Mustafa hijacked EgyptAir flight MS181 whilst it was en route from Alexandria to Cairo. Remaining at the rear of the cabin throughout the incident, he showed the crew that he was wearing what appeared to be a suicide vest. Accordingly, the crew elected to follow his request to divert to Cyprus, where he eventually surrendered. During the negotiations, he demanded to speak with his ex-wife who was resident in Cyprus. Initial reports indicate that he was suffering mental health issues.

The Final Word

BUYER’S GUIDE